Cloud Foundry and Iron.io Deliver Serverless

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This week, the Cloud Foundry Summit is happening in Frankfurt. If you are there, give us a shout. The Iron.io team is there and would love to meet with you. It looks to be a great conference.

We at Iron.io have been fortunate to have been a member of the Cloud Foundry Foundation for several years. It’s focus on high scalability, auto-scaling, and multicloud support matches what Iron.io delivers to its customers.

Today, Cloud Foundry and Iron.io took this commitment to a new level with the announcement that we are working together to bring a true multicloud serverless experience to the thousands of enterprises using Cloud Foundry. Companies can now offer their developers serverless functionality. That means developers can run code without provisioning or managing servers across multiple clouds. This is a key requirement for enterprises that maintain specific data types in an on-premises or private cloud environment.

Iron.io also announced its support for Diego as a runtime for Iron.io workloads; Iron.io is now able to be deployed on top of Cloud Foundry, run inside of Cloud Foundry, and scale out Cloud Foundry containers.

If you want to schedule a meeting at this week’s Cloud Foundry Summit in Frankfurt, or schedule a chat with those of us holding down the fort in the office, fill out this Contact Us form and we’ll get a meeting/call set up.

Massive Content, Validation & Serverless: Cloud Expo 2016 Recap

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The Cloud Expo was held June 7-9, 2016 in New York City, and Iron.io sent a team to present our vision for the future, collaborate with other attendees and answer questions. Below is a summary of three technical sessions representative of the Containers track at the conference:

Continue reading “Massive Content, Validation & Serverless: Cloud Expo 2016 Recap”

Buzzwords: Microservices, Containers and Serverless at Goto Chicago

Goto Chicago Dave Speaking

It was an honor to give a talk on the future of Serverless at goto Chicago, an enterprise developer conference running from May 24 to 25, 2016. As you can see from the full room, containers, microservices and serverless are popular topics with developers, and this interest extends across a wide swath of back-end languages, from Java to Ruby to node.js. Unfortunately, the talk was not recorded, so I’m providing these notes (and my slide deck) for those who could not attend.

The Evolution of Deployed Applications

Before we look forward into the future of Serverless, let’s look back. We’ve seen a historical evolution in deployed applications at multiple different levels. Whereas before the unit of scale was measured by how many servers you could deploy, we’ve moved through rolling out virtual machines to the current pattern of scaling our containerized infrastructure. Similarly, we’ve seen a shift from monolithic architectures deployed through major releases to containerized, continuously-updated microservices. This paradigm is Iron.io’s “sweet spot,” and we’re leading the enterprise towards a serverless computing world.

Continue reading “Buzzwords: Microservices, Containers and Serverless at Goto Chicago”

Four and a Half Years of Go in Production at goto Chicago 2016

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Travis Reeder, CTO and co-founder of Iron.io, gave a talk at Goto Chicago 2016 discussing Iron.io’s early migration to Go, why we changed our infrastructure and the benefits it has brought to us.

One of the questions that always comes up after telling people we migrated to Go is:

“Why not Ruby?”

Continue reading “Four and a Half Years of Go in Production at goto Chicago 2016”

Introducing Lambda support on Iron.io

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Serverless computing has become a compelling model for companies to add business value without their development teams having to worry about provisioning, managing and scaling infrastructure. The concept is that developers write code that performs business logic based on  some specific input data, and the platform handles the details of:

  • Where to run it: Use some machine with available capacity in its pool
  • When to run it: Either event-driven or scheduled
  • How to run it: Decouple your developers from your runtime. You do not have to be concerned about whether your program is running on bare metal, in a VM or in some sort of container

Continue reading “Introducing Lambda support on Iron.io”

Microcontainers, and Logging in Docker: Iron.io CTO speaks at Docker NYC

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Travis Reeder, the co-founder and CTO of Iron.io, spoke at last night’s Docker NYC meetup about Microcontainers. In addition, Hermann Hesse of Sumo Logic spoke about Logging in Docker.

Slack for iOS Upload

Iron.io is a big proponent of microcontainers, which are minimalistic docker containers that can still process full-fledged jobs. We’ve seen microcontainers gaining traction amongst software architects and developers because their minimalistic size makes them easy to download and distribute via a docker registry. Microcontainers are easier to secure due to the small amount of code, libraries and dependencies, which reduces the attack surface and makes the OS base more secure. Continue reading “Microcontainers, and Logging in Docker: Iron.io CTO speaks at Docker NYC”

Rails Meetup March 2016: Rails Performance Optimization, Bundler, + Internationalization­

March-Rails-Meetup

At Iron.io, we love to give back to the coding community in our hometown of San Francisco by hosting developer events through the SF Rails Meetup and the GoSF Golang Meetup. Our March 2016 meetup was a triple threat of talks on performance optimization, dependency management, and internationalization. Continue reading “Rails Meetup March 2016: Rails Performance Optimization, Bundler, + Internationalization­”

Get a Job, Container: A Serverless Workflow with Iron.io

This post originally appeared on DZone

My previous post, Distinguished Microservices: It’s in the Behavior, made a comparison between two types of microservices – real-time requests (“app-centric”) and background processes (“job-centric”). As a follow up, I wanted to take a deeper look at job-centric microservices as they set the stage for a new development paradigm — serverless computing.

Of course, this doesn’t mean we’re getting rid of the data center in any form or fashion — it simply means that we’re entering a world where developers never have to think about provisioning or managing infrastructure resources to power workloads at any scale. This is done by decoupling backend jobs as independent microservices that run through an automated workflow when a predetermined event occurs. For the developer, it’s a serverless experience.

Continue reading “Get a Job, Container: A Serverless Workflow with Iron.io”

Distinguished Microservices: It’s in the Behavior

This post originally appeared on DZone

Microservices is more than just an academic topic. It was born out of the challenges from running distributed applications at scale; enabled by recent advancements in cloud native technologies. What started as a hot topic between developers, operators, and architects alike, is now catching on within the enterprise because of what the shift in culture promises — the ability to deliver software quickly, effectively, and continuously. In today’s fast-paced and ever-changing landscape, that is more than just desirable; it’s required to stay competitive.

Culture shifts alone are not enough to make a real impact, so organizations embarking down this path must also examine what it actually means for the inner workings of their processes and systems. Dealing with immutable infrastructure and composable services at scale means investing in operational changes. While containers and their surrounding tools provide the building blocks through an independent, portable, and consistent workflow and runtime, there’s more to it than simply “build, ship, run.”

Continue reading “Distinguished Microservices: It’s in the Behavior”

How to Bake Your Own Pi

Baking Your Own Pi

It’s 3/14, and that means it’s international Pi day! A day where we rejoice over the transcendental number that seems to be everywhere.

So, why am I writing about pi on the Iron.io blog? It turns out pi is the best (read: the absolute best!) way to test out computers. It’s sufficiently random, requires large amounts of memory, CPU, and is easy to check.

I first learned about this aspect of pi while reading the book Heres Looking at Euclid. There, I also learned that Pi beyond 40 digits or so isn’t all that useful. So, why do we know pi into the billions of digits? To quote the many time world record holder,

“I have no interest as a hobby for extending the known value of pi itself. I have a major interest for improving the performance of computation. [..] Mathematical constants like the square root of 2, e, and gamma are some of the candidates, but pi is the most effective.”

How To Make Pi

I’m on board! I want to make Pi, myself. If Pi is a great way to test any computer, why not use it to test first-class distributed computing solutions, like IronWorker?

Humans have known about Pi for a while. Which is part of what makes it a great computation. We have multiple recipes for baking the same dish. That means it’s easy to check our work (by comparing two algorithms).

So, what goes into pi? How can I cook this dish? Let’s check out a few of the best recipes. Continue reading “How to Bake Your Own Pi”