IronFunctions Alpha 2

Today we are excited to announce the second alpha release of IronFunctions, the language-agnostic serverless microservices platform that you can run anywhere; on public, private, and hybrid clouds, even on your own laptop.

The initial release of IronFunctions received some amazing feedback and we’ve spent the past few months fixing many of the issues reported. Aside from fixes, the new release comes with a whole host of great new features, including:

Long(er) running containers for better performance aka Hot Functions
LRU Cache
Triggers example for OpenStack project Picasso
Initial load balancer
fn: support route headers tweaks
fn: Add rustlang support
fn: Add .NET core support
fn: Add python support

Stay tuned for the upcoming posts for insights about individual features such as the LRU, load balancer and OpenStack integrations.

What’s next?

We will be releasing a Beta with more fixes, improvements to the load balancer, and a much-anticipated new feature that will allow chaining of functions.

We’re excited to hear people’s feedback and ideas, and it’s important that we’re building something that solves real world problems so please don’t hesitate to file an issue, or join us for a chat in our channel on our Slack Team.

Thanks for all the love and support,
The Iron.io Team

Discuss on Hacker News
Join our Slack
File an Issue
Contact Iron.io about enterprise support

Announcing Project Picasso – OpenStack Functions as a Service

We are pleased to announce a new project to enable Functions as a Service (FaaS) on OpenStack — Picasso.

The mission is to provide an API for running FaaS on OpenStack, abstracting away the infrastructure layer while enabling simplicity, efficiency, and scalability for both developers and operators.

Picasso can be used to trigger functions from OpenStack services, such as Telemetry (via HTTP callback) or Swift notifications. This means no long running applications, as functions are only executed when called.

Picasso is comprised of two main components:

  • Picasso API
    • The Picasso API server uses Keystone authentication and authorization through its middleware.
  • IronFunctions
    • Picasso leverages the backend container engine provided by IronFunctions, an open-source Serverless/FaaS platform based on Docker.

Resources

 

We’ve created some initial blueprints to show what the future roadmap looks like for the project.

You can try out Picasso now on DevStack by following the quick start guide here. Let us know what you think!

If you’re interested in contributing or just have any questions, please join us on the #OpenStack channel in Slack.

Delivering on the Promise of Multicloud Lambda-like Functionality

multicloud-takeoff

In February, we launch a beta called Project Kratos. It promised to bring Lambda-like functionality to any cloud – public, private, hybrid or on-premises. As we quickly approach Q4, February seems like a long time ago, but so much has happened since then.

Over the past seven months, serverless computing has gained momentum as more than just the hot topic of the moment. Because it allows enterprises to build and deploy applications and services at scale on flexible platforms that abstract away physical infrastructure, it’s quickly becoming a must have for the modern enterprise. It will soon be a competitive advantage for those already implementing it.

Our journey with serverless has also moved from a project announcement full of promises to the solution that is widely available today.  First, in April, we announced the general availability of its multicloud solution. Since then, we’ve systematically partnered with leading cloud providers to support multicloud development.

In April, Iron.io announced its partnership with Mirantis to bring event-driven, serverless functionality to the OpenStack community. The joint solution enables enterprise developers using OpenStack to deliver applications and services faster through the serverless experience provided by Iron.io.

In May, Iron.io announced its collaboration with Cloud Foundry Foundation, home of the industry-standard multi-cloud platform, to integrate the Iron.io API with the Cloud Foundry platform.

In June, Iron.io brought the serverless experience to Red Hat OpenShift — a pairing that provided users with an end-to-end environment for building and deploying applications at scale, without the headaches of complex operations.

And in August, Iron.io announced its strategic partnership with Mesosphere, enabling microservices and serverless computing for modern data centers. Joint customers using Mesosphere’s Data Center Operating System (DC/OS) with Iron.io could experience enhanced flexibility to develop their hybrid cloud strategy and run distributed job processing across heterogeneous environments.

Yesterday, we added an announcement that serverless functionality is now available on Cloud Foundry and Iron.io supports Diego as a runtime for Iron.io workloads. Iron.io is now able to be deployed on top of Cloud Foundry, run inside of Cloud Foundry, and scale out Cloud Foundry containers.

Wow. I was here for all of it and it still seems like a lot, but it’s only the beginning. The Iron.io team is committed to bringing a serverless experiences to developers and companies far and wide.

If you want information on how we define serverless and why the world is moving this way, check out Chad Arimura’s presentation Best Practices for Implementing Serverless Architecture from the O’Reilly Software Architect conference or Dave Nugent and Ivan Dywer’s great Fireside Chat about serverless computing.

Hybrid Iron.io – On-Premise Job Processing with the Help of the Cloud

Hybrid_IronioHybridOne of our main goals for the Iron.io platform is run anywhere. This means we enable customers to use our services on any cloud, public or private. With Hybrid Iron.io, we’re making it drop dead simple to get the benefits of the public cloud, with the security and control of a private cloud. 

Using Iron.io’s public cloud service is easy, you just sign up and start using it. No servers to deal with, no setup and no maintenance. You can be up and running with a very powerful technology in a matter of minutes. It’s a beautiful thing. Continue reading “Hybrid Iron.io – On-Premise Job Processing with the Help of the Cloud”

Iron.io named an IDC Innovator in PaaS

idc-logo

Being Innovative and enabling developers to innovate are driving forces for Iron.io. It’s what we do. Having said that, it’s very nice when we receive outside recognition. When the recognition is part of a well thought out analysis from IDC, it is fantastic. I’m happy to report that, Iron.io was named an IDC Innovator in the just released IDC Innovators: Platform as a Service, 2016 report (doc #US41166516, May 2016).

The report spotlights emerging vendors with revenue under $50 million that offer an innovative new technology, a groundbreaking approach to an existing issue and/or an interesting new business model. Iron.io is among five companies named in the eight-page report by Larry Carvalho, IDC research manager in the Platform as a Service (PaaS) area. Continue reading “Iron.io named an IDC Innovator in PaaS”

Gartner Names Iron.io on 2016 “Cool Vendor” List

vTime_Gartner_160512_150155

Here’s some cool news. Iron.io was recently named a “Cool Vendor” in the Cool Vendors in Platform as a Service, 2016[1] report by Gartner. The report puts Iron.io on an extremely short list with just three other vendors in the space: Clusterpoint in London, England; Flybits in Toronto, Canada; and Neoway out of Florianopolis, Brazil.

The Cool Vendors research by Gartner is designed to help CIOs and other top IT leaders stay ahead of the IT technology curve. It also helps them make better strategic decisions about technology and services. “The vendors in this report offer new platform opportunities for business and IT, in response to increasing demand for intelligent business operations with cloud levels of scale, agility and responsiveness,” the report states. Continue reading “Gartner Names Iron.io on 2016 “Cool Vendor” List”

Introducing Lambda support on Iron.io

AWSonDocker_revised

Serverless computing has become a compelling model for companies to add business value without their development teams having to worry about provisioning, managing and scaling infrastructure. The concept is that developers write code that performs business logic based on  some specific input data, and the platform handles the details of:

  • Where to run it: Use some machine with available capacity in its pool
  • When to run it: Either event-driven or scheduled
  • How to run it: Decouple your developers from your runtime. You do not have to be concerned about whether your program is running on bare metal, in a VM or in some sort of container

Continue reading “Introducing Lambda support on Iron.io”