Massive Content, Validation & Serverless: Cloud Expo 2016 Recap

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The Cloud Expo was held June 7-9, 2016 in New York City, and Iron.io sent a team to present our vision for the future, collaborate with other attendees and answer questions. Below is a summary of three technical sessions representative of the Containers track at the conference:

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Intel: Accelerating Enterprise Innovation with Iron.io

Screen Shot 2016-04-07 at 1.52.05 PMIntel launched the OpenStack Innovation Center to build new pools of developers who write applications that run on enterprise clouds, and who understand that as they write the code for these clouds, it’s based on best practices of operational experience.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LOXYLw3Aaw

 

 

 

Intel is also working with Mirantis, Rackspace and CoreOS to make OpenStack more enterprise-ready.

Cloud Application Architecture

When application architects understand what’s happening at the infrastructure level, they want to be able to affect those decisions to improve performance. If I see that a workload is affecting another workload, or a high-priority workload (such as payroll,) I need to make sure that my applications get access to the resources they need. Intel’s Resource Director has the ability to tie the RDT features up through the layers in the infrastructure stack so it can benefit the application. Workloads can also be placed to take advantage of specific performance gains offered by certain servers, such as those offering an expanded CPU instruction set.

Intelligent Enterprise Data Centers: SNAP

How can enterprise customers use these features? Intel has been working on these features sets for years, providing visibility into into their platform. SNAP is an Intel-authored open source telemetry framework that provides detail about what’s happening on their platform into the hands of developers, so that those developers can do something with it.

Visibility is key to better decision-making in the data center.

One of the key things our team thought about when launching SNAP is that agents are difficult to operationalize because they have to be maintained individually. We asked, how can we reduce the operational burden of telemetry to zero?

Intel + Iron.io: Event-driven Job Processing for Anyone’s Data Center

Iron.io is leveraging SNAP as the way to understand the landscape of the data center, to better land workers on hardware that provides the most advantageous instruction sets, from crypto to FPGA to a vector instruction set accelerator.

Get a Job, Container: A Serverless Workflow with Iron.io

This post originally appeared on DZone

My previous post, Distinguished Microservices: It’s in the Behavior, made a comparison between two types of microservices – real-time requests (“app-centric”) and background processes (“job-centric”). As a follow up, I wanted to take a deeper look at job-centric microservices as they set the stage for a new development paradigm — serverless computing.

Of course, this doesn’t mean we’re getting rid of the data center in any form or fashion — it simply means that we’re entering a world where developers never have to think about provisioning or managing infrastructure resources to power workloads at any scale. This is done by decoupling backend jobs as independent microservices that run through an automated workflow when a predetermined event occurs. For the developer, it’s a serverless experience.

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Distinguished Microservices: It’s in the Behavior

This post originally appeared on DZone

Microservices is more than just an academic topic. It was born out of the challenges from running distributed applications at scale; enabled by recent advancements in cloud native technologies. What started as a hot topic between developers, operators, and architects alike, is now catching on within the enterprise because of what the shift in culture promises — the ability to deliver software quickly, effectively, and continuously. In today’s fast-paced and ever-changing landscape, that is more than just desirable; it’s required to stay competitive.

Culture shifts alone are not enough to make a real impact, so organizations embarking down this path must also examine what it actually means for the inner workings of their processes and systems. Dealing with immutable infrastructure and composable services at scale means investing in operational changes. While containers and their surrounding tools provide the building blocks through an independent, portable, and consistent workflow and runtime, there’s more to it than simply “build, ship, run.”

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Is Open Source Eating The World?

Is Open Source Eating the World?

Thanks to Dominic Alves for the base image! CC BY 2.0

The phrase, “Software is eating the world,” first showed up in 2011. In 2015, open source took its rightful seat at the table.

“If the theory pervades deeper – and software does eat the world – then surely open source software will swallow it, right?” Forbes hesitantly prodded in early 2015. Later in the year they more confidently thrusted with a piece titled It’s Actually Open Source Software That’s Eating the World.

This isn’t a movement spearheaded by a single voice. Wired joined with articles like, Open Source Software Went Nuclear This Year. Replete with quotes like: “This is not just a turning point, but a tipping point,” says Brandon Keepers, the head of open source at GitHub.

This was also echoed at events like Defrag2015. I attended a talk titled, “Open Platforms and Strategies – Why your platform should be open.” Wherein I heard strong conjectures such as: In about five years most products will be shipped as open source, on a platform like GitHub.

Is open source software eating the world? Is the future all GPLs, MITs, and Apache licenses? Of course not. Linux, Netscape and Apache httpd have all been hungry in the name of FOSS for a good long while.

If that’s the case, why the rush of excitement in 2015?

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Shepherding Containers

Shepherding Containers

Thanks to Yahoo for the base image CC BY 2.0

As one of the earliest users of Docker, I’ve had the pleasure of creating and working with multiple different platforms built on containers. Each platform has evolved in step with current ecosystem around it, and I’ve gotten the chance to really put Docker’s “batteries included, but removable” philosophy to the test.

Here at Iron.io, we have launched over 1 billion user containers in production, not to mention the containers we launch to keep our services running. The massive volume of containers we launch is enough to place great demands upon any platform that we use.

In our search for the right direction for the evolution of our platform, we’ve explored as many tools as possible. The release of Docker 1.9, combined with production-ready Docker Swarm and Docker Networking, brings a lot of value to those wanting to roll their own platforms.

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Defrag 2015: Our Favorites From Day Two

defrag-2015-day-2-fin

This post is a continuation of our Defrag 2015 coverage from yesterday. Read on to hear about our favorite talks from day two.

Talks

Where Does the Time Go? – Researching Top Activities At Work

Lisa Kamm is a Product Manager at Google. She got involved with a project to figure out how Googler’s spend their time at work. How could they make it better? Do their mobile products support their own workflows?

Kamm and a team of curious Googlers embarked on a journey to find out. The project started with a collaborative session, where Lisa posed the question: “Wait… what are the top 100 things an employee does in an average day.” Oops. By asking the question she surreptitiously also volunteered to find an answer.

The search for answers started the way you’d expect. Being a Googler, Kamm began the hunt for answers by analyzing a large set of data. Logs from mobile phone and computer usage seemed to be the easiest way to go. There were some hurdles with actually obtaining the logs, as well as with personal privacy. Kamm prevailed in the end, and was able to crunch down 2.5 billion records to get the data she needed.

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Defrag 2015, Our Favorites From Day One

Defrag 2015 Day One Highlights

Yesterday was the start of the 9th annual Defrag conference! What is Defrag?

Defrag describes itself as: “We explore the frontiers of technology’s intersections with society, government, education, healthcare, and commerce through discussions and sessions rooted in topics like cloud computing, APIs, mobile technologies, big data, devops, the internet of things, and next generation human computer interaction.”

Neat! Read on to hear highlights from the first day of festivities.

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#GoSF: Identity, Safe Secrets, and IoT Friendly Languages

GoSF at Betable

The Go gopher was designed by Renee French. CC BY 3.0 US

Last night’s meetup, which was hosted by Betable, included two presentations and two lightning talks rounding out a solid evening for the GoSF group. Topics included identity on the web, safe storage of tokens (beyond ENV vars), and even the debut of a new Go-inspired embedded systems language.

Let’s take a look at each!

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Favorites from GitHub Universe

GitHub Universe

Remember when enterprise shied away from Open Source software? I sure do. The times they aren’t a changin’.  Led to by the desire to cut costs and create better products, companies are embracing open source. Business today runs on a mix of open and closed solutions.

Nowhere was this more apparent than at the inaugural GitHub Universe conference last week.

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