Navigating the Cloud Foundry Ecosystem of Ecosystems: An ISV Perspective

By Cloud Foundry

Even Neil Degrasse Tyson would be impressed with how quickly and effectively the Cloud Foundry community has evolved into a fully organic ecosystem of ecosystems. This is because forward thinking organizations are putting a stake in the ground that Cloud Foundry will be the foundation for all future software development and deployment. In this multi-cloud platform-centric world, where do the ISVs fit?

As a relatively new member of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, Iron.io has first hand experience how to communicate, collaborate, and contribute with the members of the community to extend the platform where applicable and satisfy customer needs when requested. They key is knowing what you bring to the table, and doing it the cloud native way.

In this session, Ivan Dwyer shares a few anecdotes from Iron.io’s experiences working with Cloud Foundry community partners across integration engineering, co-marketing, and joint sales efforts – what’s worked, what hasn’t, and what’s coming next.

OpenShift Ecosystem: Iron.io Brings a Serverless Experience to OpenShift

There has been a lot of buzz around the Serverless trend lately; what it really means and what are its merits. At the end of the day it’s really just a new way to treat certain workloads – background jobs. How does this new pattern fit in the context of developing cloud native applications and operating container platforms such as Red Hat OpenShift?

LAYING THE FOUNDATION

Delivering continuous innovation to customers often leads to continuous pressure on the developers to build and ship software… well, continuously. Smart companies are doing all they can to empower their development teams with the right culture to encourage productivity, and the right tools to make it happen. Emerging as the foundational layer for many organizations’ application development efforts is a container application platform, with OpenShift as a leading choice.

As infrastructure resources continue to be commoditized, and as services continue to be exposed as APIs, having a foundational layer is critical to bring everything together. This is especially important when dealing with multiple distributed applications and multiple distributed teams, as containerized applications, workloads, and services need a unifying environment. Continue reading “OpenShift Ecosystem: Iron.io Brings a Serverless Experience to OpenShift”

Hybrid Iron.io – On-Premise Job Processing with the Help of the Cloud

Hybrid_IronioHybridOne of our main goals for the Iron.io platform is run anywhere. This means we enable customers to use our services on any cloud, public or private. With Hybrid Iron.io, we’re making it drop dead simple to get the benefits of the public cloud, with the security and control of a private cloud. 

Using Iron.io’s public cloud service is easy, you just sign up and start using it. No servers to deal with, no setup and no maintenance. You can be up and running with a very powerful technology in a matter of minutes. It’s a beautiful thing. Continue reading “Hybrid Iron.io – On-Premise Job Processing with the Help of the Cloud”

Buzzwords: Microservices, Containers and Serverless at Goto Chicago

Goto Chicago Dave Speaking

It was an honor to give a talk on the future of Serverless at goto Chicago, an enterprise developer conference running from May 24 to 25, 2016. As you can see from the full room, containers, microservices and serverless are popular topics with developers, and this interest extends across a wide swath of back-end languages, from Java to Ruby to node.js. Unfortunately, the talk was not recorded, so I’m providing these notes (and my slide deck) for those who could not attend.

The Evolution of Deployed Applications

Before we look forward into the future of Serverless, let’s look back. We’ve seen a historical evolution in deployed applications at multiple different levels. Whereas before the unit of scale was measured by how many servers you could deploy, we’ve moved through rolling out virtual machines to the current pattern of scaling our containerized infrastructure. Similarly, we’ve seen a shift from monolithic architectures deployed through major releases to containerized, continuously-updated microservices. This paradigm is Iron.io’s “sweet spot,” and we’re leading the enterprise towards a serverless computing world.

Continue reading “Buzzwords: Microservices, Containers and Serverless at Goto Chicago”

Iron.io named an IDC Innovator in PaaS

idc-logo

Being Innovative and enabling developers to innovate are driving forces for Iron.io. It’s what we do. Having said that, it’s very nice when we receive outside recognition. When the recognition is part of a well thought out analysis from IDC, it is fantastic. I’m happy to report that, Iron.io was named an IDC Innovator in the just released IDC Innovators: Platform as a Service, 2016 report (doc #US41166516, May 2016).

The report spotlights emerging vendors with revenue under $50 million that offer an innovative new technology, a groundbreaking approach to an existing issue and/or an interesting new business model. Iron.io is among five companies named in the eight-page report by Larry Carvalho, IDC research manager in the Platform as a Service (PaaS) area. Continue reading “Iron.io named an IDC Innovator in PaaS”

Four and a Half Years of Go in Production at goto Chicago 2016

GOTO_Chicago2016

Travis Reeder, CTO and co-founder of Iron.io, gave a talk at Goto Chicago 2016 discussing Iron.io’s early migration to Go, why we changed our infrastructure and the benefits it has brought to us.

One of the questions that always comes up after telling people we migrated to Go is:

“Why not Ruby?”

Continue reading “Four and a Half Years of Go in Production at goto Chicago 2016”

GopherFest Summer 2016 Recap

GopherFest

Hundreds of Go enthusiasts gathered at the prestigious Bently Reserve in downtown San Francisco for a day full of talks about data science, scaling, testing, speed, code reuse and refactoring, all in the context of Golang. Below, a write-up of a few selected talks:

Built for Snappiness by Blake Mizerany @bmizerany

When I was in the Ruby community, I built Sinatra. I’ve been using Go since 2009. Now I’m the founder at backplane.io.

Snappy == happy users

Slowness is inexcusable. So much work has gone into allowing engineers to build snappy websites. If you have a powerful language that lets you do powerful things, and things are slow, it’s even more frustrating.

Continue reading “GopherFest Summer 2016 Recap”

We Want To Hear From You

drone_emailCompanies continue to evolve their approach to application development and cloud deployment. Over the next 15 days, we’ll be surveying you, and people like you, to find out how this evolution looks in many types of organizations.

All responses are kept 100% confidential and will not be shared with anyone outside of Iron.io. Responses will be anonymously aggregated and the results will be discussed in a webcast in early-June.

To thank survey respondents, all completed entries will be eligible for our drawing for a drone equipped with a GoPro-ready fixed camera mount. The lucky winner will be announced during an upcoming webcast as well.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Microservices Architecture and Container Technology Explained

IDG_ContainerTechnologyExplained_nologo

Guest blog by Bob Johnson Vice President & Principal Analyst at IDG Connect

Fighting for space in the world of web based services and applications needs a quick eye and a strong software development arm, and companies everywhere are looking at new ways to boost agility and shorten their time to market.

One of these is microservices, a software based system architecture which supports the construction of complex applications out of smaller independent processes that exist as standalone mini-applications in their own right. These individual components communicate with each other through language agnostic application programming interfaces (APIs) and simple protocols such as Remote Method Invocation (RMI), Restful Web Services or Push Messaging, for example.

This modular approach can make it easier for companies to spread their workloads across multiple development teams spanning different departments or businesses, offering a greater degree of flexibility and helping to speed up the project lifecycle. Continue reading “Microservices Architecture and Container Technology Explained”

Batch Processing: A Tutorial on Workers, Queueing and Gelato

Worker_Queue_Gelato_V2

Batch processing is one of the earliest ways of data processing, utilized by Herman Hollerith’s Tabulating Machine in 1890. Batch processing was developed to take advantage of scarce computing resources: it avoids idling these expensive resources by queueing instructions to process data without manual user intervention, and can shift workload to times when resources are less scarce1.

Today, we can leverage modern architectural patterns like worker systems, message queues and the cloud to level-up these advantages and simplify our code. Let’s look at an example of queueing and workers using a calorie-dense metaphor: gelato.

gelato2

Using our favorite local gelato shop as an example, we explore how architectural concepts like queueing and workers can affect a given task. We chose gelato because:

  • Each order takes time to set up. You must examine the menu and display, choose and order.
  • Each order takes time to process. The time spent preparing an order can vary based on the order size and complexity, just as job size can vary in a worker system.
  • Adding additional workers helps. The queue of customers will be processed faster, in the same way that adding more workers to a particular batch processing job will make the queue shrink faster.
  • Like your infrastructure, gelato must be kept cold, and is delicious when consumed2.

Check it out:

1 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batch_processing

2This is not true. Iron.io assumes no responsibility if you eat your infrastructure.