Announcing Project Picasso – OpenStack Functions as a Service

We are pleased to announce a new project to enable Functions as a Service (FaaS) on OpenStack — Picasso.

The mission is to provide an API for running FaaS on OpenStack, abstracting away the infrastructure layer while enabling simplicity, efficiency, and scalability for both developers and operators.

Picasso can be used to trigger functions from OpenStack services, such as Telemetry (via HTTP callback) or Swift notifications. This means no long running applications, as functions are only executed when called.

Picasso is comprised of two main components:

  • Picasso API
    • The Picasso API server uses Keystone authentication and authorization through its middleware.
  • IronFunctions
    • Picasso leverages the backend container engine provided by IronFunctions, an open-source Serverless/FaaS platform based on Docker.

Resources

 

We’ve created some initial blueprints to show what the future roadmap looks like for the project.

You can try out Picasso now on DevStack by following the quick start guide here. Let us know what you think!

If you’re interested in contributing or just have any questions, please join us on the #OpenStack channel in Slack.

Delivering on the Promise of Multicloud Lambda-like Functionality

multicloud-takeoff

In February, we launch a beta called Project Kratos. It promised to bring Lambda-like functionality to any cloud – public, private, hybrid or on-premises. As we quickly approach Q4, February seems like a long time ago, but so much has happened since then.

Over the past seven months, serverless computing has gained momentum as more than just the hot topic of the moment. Because it allows enterprises to build and deploy applications and services at scale on flexible platforms that abstract away physical infrastructure, it’s quickly becoming a must have for the modern enterprise. It will soon be a competitive advantage for those already implementing it.

Our journey with serverless has also moved from a project announcement full of promises to the solution that is widely available today.  First, in April, we announced the general availability of its multicloud solution. Since then, we’ve systematically partnered with leading cloud providers to support multicloud development.

In April, Iron.io announced its partnership with Mirantis to bring event-driven, serverless functionality to the OpenStack community. The joint solution enables enterprise developers using OpenStack to deliver applications and services faster through the serverless experience provided by Iron.io.

In May, Iron.io announced its collaboration with Cloud Foundry Foundation, home of the industry-standard multi-cloud platform, to integrate the Iron.io API with the Cloud Foundry platform.

In June, Iron.io brought the serverless experience to Red Hat OpenShift — a pairing that provided users with an end-to-end environment for building and deploying applications at scale, without the headaches of complex operations.

And in August, Iron.io announced its strategic partnership with Mesosphere, enabling microservices and serverless computing for modern data centers. Joint customers using Mesosphere’s Data Center Operating System (DC/OS) with Iron.io could experience enhanced flexibility to develop their hybrid cloud strategy and run distributed job processing across heterogeneous environments.

Yesterday, we added an announcement that serverless functionality is now available on Cloud Foundry and Iron.io supports Diego as a runtime for Iron.io workloads. Iron.io is now able to be deployed on top of Cloud Foundry, run inside of Cloud Foundry, and scale out Cloud Foundry containers.

Wow. I was here for all of it and it still seems like a lot, but it’s only the beginning. The Iron.io team is committed to bringing a serverless experiences to developers and companies far and wide.

If you want information on how we define serverless and why the world is moving this way, check out Chad Arimura’s presentation Best Practices for Implementing Serverless Architecture from the O’Reilly Software Architect conference or Dave Nugent and Ivan Dywer’s great Fireside Chat about serverless computing.

Intel: Accelerating Enterprise Innovation with Iron.io

Screen Shot 2016-04-07 at 1.52.05 PMIntel launched the OpenStack Innovation Center to build new pools of developers who write applications that run on enterprise clouds, and who understand that as they write the code for these clouds, it’s based on best practices of operational experience.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LOXYLw3Aaw

 

 

 

Intel is also working with Mirantis, Rackspace and CoreOS to make OpenStack more enterprise-ready.

Cloud Application Architecture

When application architects understand what’s happening at the infrastructure level, they want to be able to affect those decisions to improve performance. If I see that a workload is affecting another workload, or a high-priority workload (such as payroll,) I need to make sure that my applications get access to the resources they need. Intel’s Resource Director has the ability to tie the RDT features up through the layers in the infrastructure stack so it can benefit the application. Workloads can also be placed to take advantage of specific performance gains offered by certain servers, such as those offering an expanded CPU instruction set.

Intelligent Enterprise Data Centers: SNAP

How can enterprise customers use these features? Intel has been working on these features sets for years, providing visibility into into their platform. SNAP is an Intel-authored open source telemetry framework that provides detail about what’s happening on their platform into the hands of developers, so that those developers can do something with it.

Visibility is key to better decision-making in the data center.

One of the key things our team thought about when launching SNAP is that agents are difficult to operationalize because they have to be maintained individually. We asked, how can we reduce the operational burden of telemetry to zero?

Intel + Iron.io: Event-driven Job Processing for Anyone’s Data Center

Iron.io is leveraging SNAP as the way to understand the landscape of the data center, to better land workers on hardware that provides the most advantageous instruction sets, from crypto to FPGA to a vector instruction set accelerator.

Iron.io Joins OpenStack to Drive Open Cloud Message Queues

Iron.io is now an OpenStack supporter. This may not appear all that unusual – given the top companies originally behind the initiative plus the growing numbers joining – but it is noteworthy for a cloud services company. 
Continue reading “Iron.io Joins OpenStack to Drive Open Cloud Message Queues”