Delivering on the Promise of Multicloud Lambda-like Functionality

multicloud-takeoff

In February, we launch a beta called Project Kratos. It promised to bring Lambda-like functionality to any cloud – public, private, hybrid or on-premises. As we quickly approach Q4, February seems like a long time ago, but so much has happened since then.

Over the past seven months, serverless computing has gained momentum as more than just the hot topic of the moment. Because it allows enterprises to build and deploy applications and services at scale on flexible platforms that abstract away physical infrastructure, it’s quickly becoming a must have for the modern enterprise. It will soon be a competitive advantage for those already implementing it.

Our journey with serverless has also moved from a project announcement full of promises to the solution that is widely available today.  First, in April, we announced the general availability of its multicloud solution. Since then, we’ve systematically partnered with leading cloud providers to support multicloud development.

In April, Iron.io announced its partnership with Mirantis to bring event-driven, serverless functionality to the OpenStack community. The joint solution enables enterprise developers using OpenStack to deliver applications and services faster through the serverless experience provided by Iron.io.

In May, Iron.io announced its collaboration with Cloud Foundry Foundation, home of the industry-standard multi-cloud platform, to integrate the Iron.io API with the Cloud Foundry platform.

In June, Iron.io brought the serverless experience to Red Hat OpenShift — a pairing that provided users with an end-to-end environment for building and deploying applications at scale, without the headaches of complex operations.

And in August, Iron.io announced its strategic partnership with Mesosphere, enabling microservices and serverless computing for modern data centers. Joint customers using Mesosphere’s Data Center Operating System (DC/OS) with Iron.io could experience enhanced flexibility to develop their hybrid cloud strategy and run distributed job processing across heterogeneous environments.

Yesterday, we added an announcement that serverless functionality is now available on Cloud Foundry and Iron.io supports Diego as a runtime for Iron.io workloads. Iron.io is now able to be deployed on top of Cloud Foundry, run inside of Cloud Foundry, and scale out Cloud Foundry containers.

Wow. I was here for all of it and it still seems like a lot, but it’s only the beginning. The Iron.io team is committed to bringing a serverless experiences to developers and companies far and wide.

If you want information on how we define serverless and why the world is moving this way, check out Chad Arimura’s presentation Best Practices for Implementing Serverless Architecture from the O’Reilly Software Architect conference or Dave Nugent and Ivan Dywer’s great Fireside Chat about serverless computing.